Archive for March, 2016


BNA Bucket list

A driveway for both: 

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AND
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When I was in high school, people use to have these rolled up wads of paper delivered to their residence twice a day. They were called “newspapers.” Prior to the internet, this is how most people got their daily dispatch. I was one of many teenagers that delivered them in Nashville. Rain, sleet and snow on my little motorcycle.

In the 70’s there were two primary newspapers in Middle Tennessee: the morning paper, The Tennessean, and the afternoon paper, The Nashville Banner. The Tennessean was delivered early in the morning, The Banner in the late afternoon. At the time, The Tennessean was considered a more Democratic news source* (I remember: Pravda on The Cumberland by some), The Banner was decidedly more Republican by nature. They debated everything, political and non.

What separates news consumers from now and then?

MOST PEOPLE THEN READ BOTH

Aside from the physical dexterity of not landing it in…

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These old family cemeteries are important registers of our past for a lot of reasons. As Nashville explodes in all directions, it’s extremely important to act now to save them. If you are interested in some Rutherford County projects, follow https://southernrootsandbranches.wordpress.com. for upcoming projects.

Southern Rambles

By Dr. Stacey Graham, Research Professor, Center for Historic Preservation

All across Tennessee, rural family cemeteries are gradually succumbing to neglect, development, and vandalism. Because the resources available for saving these cemeteries are few, a solution can seem overwhelming and out of reach. However, no one should underestimate the power of a small group of people to make a big difference. This is what happened for the Templeton Grove Cemetery of Smyrna, Tennessee.

Just a few short months ago, this tiny family cemetery, unused since 1915, was barely visible in the dense underbrush. Many tombstones were fallen, broken, cracked, lost, or in danger of becoming so. Today, the tombstones are restored, the cemetery is cleared, a new fence stands around it, and a sign proclaims its name and importance to all visitors. The story of what happened during those few short months is the subject of this blog, and is…

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